isleofmanspaceThe International Institute of Space Commerce is the world’s leading nonpartisan think-tank dedicated to the study of the business, economics, and commerce of space.

Our goal is to transform the global discussion on space commerce working to solve the issues it faces today and tomorrow by driving forward the conversation with a marketplace of new ideas by providing this home for the exchange, discussion, and creation of new ideas in space commerce.

Being international in its reach and a non partisan ‘Think Tank’ drawing upon new ideas and solutions to existing and future problems the space industry faces by drawing together experts from academia, government, the media, business, international and non-governmental organizations, most notably those from the ISU and its extended network of people and resources.

Why not join us and contribute to the conversation? Thanks to our sponsors and partners, it’s free.

Our members are drawn from around the world from private citizens to policy makers, from academics and students to industry leaders. All are contributing to the growing conversation and ideas about space commerce today and its future for all tomorrow.

Soyuz_TMA-7_spacecraft2edit1Every nation in the world, every economic sector, and near every human being today depends upon the products and services of the space industry.

Since the launch of Sputnik in 1957, the global space industry has grown enormously to encompass the annual $300 billion satellite communications industry[1], itself supporting the $4.3 trillion a year telecommunications industry[2], on through to the provision of weather satellites and global positioning systems changing the way the world feeds itself through to the revolution in remote sensing changing the way we see our lives and further to the cutting edge frontier of the commercialization of human spaceflight with space tourism, the International Space Station, Asteroid mining, and so much more.

How is all of this evolving and growing in this age of exponential technology, of industry disruption, this second renaissance, this digital renaissance?   Help us in answering these and other questions. Join the conversation?

The Institute publishes papers, holds workshops and events, and supports conferences around the world.

To date, the Institute has published over 40 papers from industry and academic leaders which have been delivered by invitation at venues ranging from the US National Academy of Sciences in Washington DC to the International Space University in Strasbourg, to the International Astronomical Congress in Toronto and Jerusalem, covering topics as diverse as the commercial use of the International Space Station on through to the use of private capital for the provision of public science missions.

Why not submit a paper for publication?

The Institute was founded in 2007 as a Not for Profit Isle of Man Company and is been located at the Nunnery in Douglas on the Isle of Man, drawing from the Isle of Man’s growing role and importance in the world’s space industry.

[1] Source: Space Foundation www.spacefoundation.org

[2] Source: Satellite Industry Association www.sia.org

walter_peeters_profileDr. Walter Peters

Dean & Vice-President for Academic Affairs
Professor in Space Business and Management
International Space University (ISU), Strasbourg, France

Career: Initial management positions in construction and petrochemical industry. Joined the European Space Agency (ESA) in 1983 in a number of project control and management functions, among others in the HERMES project in Toulouse, France. Since 1980, involved in astronaut activities as Head of the Coordination Office of the European Astronaut Center in Cologne, with strong involvement in the EUROMIR missions. Joined ISU (International Space University) in 2000, after serving as visiting professor (Non-profit Marketing) at the University of Louvain, Belgium. Nominated as dean of ISU in 2005.

Publications: Author of articles on incentive contracting, project management, space commercialization and organization in the space sector. Author of the book Space Marketing (Kluwer, 2000). Recent research on space commercialization, financing models of space projects and space tourism. Contributor to various organizations in the area of space commercialization (Working Group 2000, JAXA, OECD, IAC, IBA, EC).

Consultancy assignments (recent): Space Policy (Luxemburg, Estonia), Space Tourism (Singapore spaceport, Gallactic Suite)

Education: Bachelor’s degrees in engineering and applied economics (Catholic University of Louvain), Master of Business Administration degree (Louvain, Cornell University), Ph.D. degree in Industrial Organization (TU Delft, the Netherlands)

The Economy of Space has considerably changed over the last few decades. Starting from an almost exclusively government-driven sector in the 1950’s and 1960’s, one can note a strong shift from R&D towards commercial industrial and service applications since. The 2008 Space Report of the Space Foundation estimates that only 31% of the recent space activities are government funded, with 14% commercial infrastructure and 55% commercial space activities.

However, more than these figures express, space is still an economic sector in transition. The vested Treaties, which were developed in the early days of government-led space exploration, are forming a strong regulatory backbone, but will have to be supplemented to remain effective within a commercially oriented framework.

Under these circumstances, the initiative taken by the Isle of Man Government by creating the International Institute of Space Commerce (IISC) is very timely. This decision reflects how the Isle and in particular the E-Business and Space Commerce division of the Treasury understand and commit themselves to the needs of the rapidly expanding new space economy.

The objective of IISC will be primarily to act as an independent platform for space commerce studies which are close to the needs of the commercial space sector. Indeed, in the tradition of the International Space University (ISU), close interrelation will be sought with the main stakeholders in order to make sure that those issues are treated with priority which are sensed to be the most relevant and urgent one.

This way, IISC hopes to fulfil a role as a facilitator for increased activity in the new Space Economy and it is an honour for me to be able to initiate these endeavours.
Prof. W. Peeters
IISC Director
Vice-President Academic Affairs, ISU

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